Auto-Tune In Situ: Digital Vocal Correction and Conversational Repair

Eliot Bates and Samantha Bennett's edited volume on Critical Approach to the Production of Music and Sound is now out! It's an extremely diverse and exciting collection of essays, and I was lucky enough to get to contribute a chapter on pitch correction and conversational repair. RIYL Auto-Tune, Conversation Analysis, transcoding, repair studies, reflexivity, and speech prosody. A sample diagram:

might help with that score.jpg

 

 

Time: Mechanism and Measurement

Teaching a seminar on time this winter at UC Davis. Here's the flyer:

 And here's the readings list:   
  
 
  
     
  
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         ADDIN Mendeley Bibliography CSL_BIBLIOGRAPHY     Adam, Barbara. 2002. “Perceptions of Time.” In  Companion Encyclopedia of Anthropology , edited by Tim Ingold, 503–26. London and New York: Routledge.  Borges, Jorge Luis. 1962. “Funes, The Memorious.” In  Ficciones , 107–15. New York: Grove Press.  Chiang, Ted. 1998. “Story of Your Life.”  Starlight 2 .  Cushman, Robert E. 1953. “Greek and Christian Views of Time.”  The Journal of Religion  33 (4): 254–65.  Drake, Stillman. 1975. “The Role of Music in Galileo’s Experiments.”  Scientific American  72: 98–105.  Elias, N. 1992.  Time: An Essay . http://www.umlaufoviny.com/Liberec/CAD/texty/Elias_Time.pdf.  Evans-Pritchard, E.E. 1939. “Nuer Time-Reckoning.”  Africa: Journal of the International African Institute  12 (2): 189–216.  Flusser, Vilem. 2012. “Vampyroteuthian Existence.” In  Vampyroteuthis Infernalis , 71–80. New York: Atropos Press.  Galison, Peter. 2000. “Einstein’s Clocks: The Place of TIme.”  Critical Inquiry  26 (2): 355–89.  Geertz, Clifford. 1973. “Person, Time, and Conduct in Bali.” In  The Interpretation of Cultures , 360–412. New York, N.Y.: Basic Books. http://hypergeertz.jku.at/GeertzTexts/Person_Time_Conduct.htm.  Gleick, James. 2016. “A Nonlinear History of Time Travel.”  Nautilus , September. http://nautil.us/issue/40/learning/a-nonlinear-history-of-time-travel.  Glucksmann, Miriam A. 1998. “‘What a Difference a Day Makes’: A Theoretical and Historical Exploration of Temporality and Gender.”  Sociology  32 (2): 239–58.  Greenwood, Veronique. 2016. “How Sunflowers Follow the SUn.”  The Atlantic , August. http://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2016/08/why-sunflowers-follow-the-sun/497711/.  Ingold, Tim. 2000. “Work, Time and Industry.” In  The Perception of the Environment , 323–38. London and New York: Routledge.  Jackson, Steven J. 2016. “Speed, Time, Infrastructure: Temporalities of Breakdown, Maintenance, and Repair.” In  Sociology of Speed . Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.  Lakoff, George, and Mark Johnson. 1980.  Metaphors We Live By . Chicago: University of Chicago Press.  Le Goff, Jacques. 1980. “Merchant’s Time and Church’s Time in the Middle Ages.” In  Time, Work, and Culture in the Middle Ages , edited by Arthur Goldhammer, 29–42. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.  Lefebvre, Henri, and Catherine Regulier. 1999. “The Rhythmanalytical Project.”  Rethinking Marxism  11 (1): 5–13.  Lock, Margaret. 2004. “Living Cadavers and the Calculation of Death.”  Body & Society  10 (2–3): 135–52.  Marx, Karl. 1867. “The Working Day.” In  Capital, Volume 1 . https://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1867-c1/ch10.htm.  Miyazaki, Shintaro. 2012. “Algorhythmics: Understanding Micro-Temporality in Computational Cultures.”  Computational Culture , no. 28 September.  Munn, Nancy D. 1992. “The Cultural Anthropology of Time: A Critical Essay.”  Annual Review of Anthropology  21: 93–123.  Postill, John. 2002. “Clock and Calendar Time: A Missing Anthropological Problem.”  Time & Society  11 (23): 251–70.  Sanger, Eva. 2015. “Obstetrical Care as a Matter of Time: Ultrasound Screening, Temporality and Prevention.”  HPLS  37 (1): 104–20.  Schivelbusch, Wolfgang. 1986. “Railroad Space and Railroad Time.” In  The Railway Journey: The Industrialization of Time and Space in the 19th Century , 33–44. University of California Press. http://www.daaq.net/folio/bibliography/b_schivelbusch.html.  Spinney, Laura. 2005. “How Time Flies.”  Guardian Unlimited , February 24. https://www.theguardian.com/science/2005/feb/24/4.  Thompson, E. P. 1967. “Time, Work-Discipline, and Industrial Capitalism.”  Past & Present , no. 38: 56–97.  Traweek, Sharon. 1992.  Beamtimes and Lifetimes: The World of High Energy Physicists . Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press.  Treas, Judith. 2009. “Age in Standards and Standards for Age: Institutionalizing Chronological Age as Biographical Necessity.” In  Standards and Their Stories: How Quantifying Classifying and Formalizing Practices Shape Everyday Life , edited by Martha Lampland and Susan Leigh Star, 65–87. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.  Tsing, Anna Lowenhaupt. 2015. “Arts of Noticing.” In  The Mushroom at the End of the World: On the Possibility of Life in Capitalist Ruins , 17–25. Princeton: Princeton UP.  Wajcman, Judy. 2008. “Life in the Fast Lane? Towards a Sociology of Technology and Time.”  The British Journal of Sociology  59 (1): 59–77. doi:10.1111/j.1468-4446.2007.00182.x.  Whorf, Benjamin Lee. 1956. “The Relation of Habitual Thought and Behavior to Language.” In  Language, Thought, and Reality , edited by John B Carroll, 134–59. New York, N.Y: MIT Press and John Wiley & Sons.  Zalasiewicz, Jan, Mark Williams, Alan Haywood, and Michael Ellis. 2011. “The Anthropocene: A New Epoch of Geological Time?”  Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society , no. 369: 835–41.                 

And here's the readings list:

Adam, Barbara. 2002. “Perceptions of Time.” In Companion Encyclopedia of Anthropology, edited by Tim Ingold, 503–26. London and New York: Routledge.

Borges, Jorge Luis. 1962. “Funes, The Memorious.” In Ficciones, 107–15. New York: Grove Press.

Chiang, Ted. 1998. “Story of Your Life.” Starlight 2.

Cushman, Robert E. 1953. “Greek and Christian Views of Time.” The Journal of Religion 33 (4): 254–65.

Drake, Stillman. 1975. “The Role of Music in Galileo’s Experiments.” Scientific American 72: 98–105.

Elias, N. 1992. Time: An Essay. http://www.umlaufoviny.com/Liberec/CAD/texty/Elias_Time.pdf.

Evans-Pritchard, E.E. 1939. “Nuer Time-Reckoning.” Africa: Journal of the International African Institute 12 (2): 189–216.

Flusser, Vilem. 2012. “Vampyroteuthian Existence.” In Vampyroteuthis Infernalis, 71–80. New York: Atropos Press.

Galison, Peter. 2000. “Einstein’s Clocks: The Place of TIme.” Critical Inquiry 26 (2): 355–89.

Geertz, Clifford. 1973. “Person, Time, and Conduct in Bali.” In The Interpretation of Cultures, 360–412. New York, N.Y.: Basic Books. http://hypergeertz.jku.at/GeertzTexts/Person_Time_Conduct.htm.

Gleick, James. 2016. “A Nonlinear History of Time Travel.” Nautilus, September. http://nautil.us/issue/40/learning/a-nonlinear-history-of-time-travel.

Glucksmann, Miriam A. 1998. “‘What a Difference a Day Makes’: A Theoretical and Historical Exploration of Temporality and Gender.” Sociology 32 (2): 239–58.

Greenwood, Veronique. 2016. “How Sunflowers Follow the SUn.” The Atlantic, August. http://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2016/08/why-sunflowers-follow-the-sun/497711/.

Ingold, Tim. 2000. “Work, Time and Industry.” In The Perception of the Environment, 323–38. London and New York: Routledge.

Jackson, Steven J. 2016. “Speed, Time, Infrastructure: Temporalities of Breakdown, Maintenance, and Repair.” In Sociology of Speed. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Lakoff, George, and Mark Johnson. 1980. Metaphors We Live By. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Le Goff, Jacques. 1980. “Merchant’s Time and Church’s Time in the Middle Ages.” In Time, Work, and Culture in the Middle Ages, edited by Arthur Goldhammer, 29–42. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Lefebvre, Henri, and Catherine Regulier. 1999. “The Rhythmanalytical Project.” Rethinking Marxism 11 (1): 5–13.

Lock, Margaret. 2004. “Living Cadavers and the Calculation of Death.” Body & Society 10 (2–3): 135–52.

Marx, Karl. 1867. “The Working Day.” In Capital, Volume 1. https://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1867-c1/ch10.htm.

Miyazaki, Shintaro. 2012. “Algorhythmics: Understanding Micro-Temporality in Computational Cultures.” Computational Culture, no. 28 September.

Munn, Nancy D. 1992. “The Cultural Anthropology of Time: A Critical Essay.” Annual Review of Anthropology 21: 93–123.

Postill, John. 2002. “Clock and Calendar Time: A Missing Anthropological Problem.” Time & Society 11 (23): 251–70.

Sanger, Eva. 2015. “Obstetrical Care as a Matter of Time: Ultrasound Screening, Temporality and Prevention.” HPLS 37 (1): 104–20.

Schivelbusch, Wolfgang. 1986. “Railroad Space and Railroad Time.” In The Railway Journey: The Industrialization of Time and Space in the 19th Century, 33–44. University of California Press. http://www.daaq.net/folio/bibliography/b_schivelbusch.html.

Spinney, Laura. 2005. “How Time Flies.” Guardian Unlimited, February 24. https://www.theguardian.com/science/2005/feb/24/4.

Thompson, E. P. 1967. “Time, Work-Discipline, and Industrial Capitalism.” Past & Present, no. 38: 56–97.

Traweek, Sharon. 1992. Beamtimes and Lifetimes: The World of High Energy Physicists. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press.

Treas, Judith. 2009. “Age in Standards and Standards for Age: Institutionalizing Chronological Age as Biographical Necessity.” In Standards and Their Stories: How Quantifying Classifying and Formalizing Practices Shape Everyday Life, edited by Martha Lampland and Susan Leigh Star, 65–87. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.

Tsing, Anna Lowenhaupt. 2015. “Arts of Noticing.” In The Mushroom at the End of the World: On the Possibility of Life in Capitalist Ruins, 17–25. Princeton: Princeton UP.

Wajcman, Judy. 2008. “Life in the Fast Lane? Towards a Sociology of Technology and Time.” The British Journal of Sociology 59 (1): 59–77. doi:10.1111/j.1468-4446.2007.00182.x.

Whorf, Benjamin Lee. 1956. “The Relation of Habitual Thought and Behavior to Language.” In Language, Thought, and Reality, edited by John B Carroll, 134–59. New York, N.Y: MIT Press and John Wiley & Sons.

Zalasiewicz, Jan, Mark Williams, Alan Haywood, and Michael Ellis. 2011. “The Anthropocene: A New Epoch of Geological Time?” Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, no. 369: 835–41.

 

 

Three Electric Guitar Compositions

For Sean Matthew Montgomery

1. Connect a guitar to an amplifier with as long an instrument cable as is available. Turn the amplifier off and hide the guitar, still plugged in, somewhere out of the amplifier's line of sight. The amplifier should then be turned on and the settings adjusted until feedback is produced.

2. Bury an electric guitar in a (preferably wooden) box, facing upwards, with its cable running to the surface. Plug cable into an above-ground amplifier placed on or near the place where the guitar is buried in such a way that feedback is produced. Alternatively, the amplifier cabinet may be secretly buried by a third party, who may then invite the performer to locate it by using the guitar as a dowsing rod.

3. Anoint an electric guitar and amplifier with moose scent and place in the woods with an appropriate remote power source. Substitute animals and lures as needed.

 

 

Wallace Stegner on The Doppler Effect and Historical Experience

“The sound of anything coming at you–a train, say, or the future–has a higher pitch than the sound of the same thing going away. If you have perfect pitch and a head for mathematics, you can compute the speed of the object by the interval between it’s arriving and departing sounds. I have neither perfect pitch nor a head for mathematics, and anyway, who wants to compute the speed of history? Like all falling bodies, it constantly accelerates. But I would like to hear your life as you heard it, coming at you, instead of hearing it as I do, a sober sound of expectations reduced, desire blunted, hopes deferred or abandoned, chances lost, defeats accepted, griefs borne.”

     (Angle of Repose pp. 25)

Merleau-Ponty on Sleep

"Neither symptom nor cure is worked out at the level of objective or positing consciousness, but below that level. Loss of voice as a situation may be compared to sleep: I lie down in bed, on my left side, with my knees drawn up; I close my eyes and breathe slowly, putting my plans out of my mind. But the power of my will or consciousness stops there. As the faithful, in the Dionysian mysteries, invoke the god by miming scenes from his life, I call up the visitation of sleep by imitating the breathing and posture of the sleeper . The god is actually there when the faithful can no longer distinguish themselves from the part they are playing, when their body and their consciousness cease to bring in, as an obstacle, their particular opacity, and when they are totally fused in the myth. There is a moment when sleep ‘comes’, settling on this imitation of itself which I have been offering to it, and I succeed in becoming what I was trying to be: an unseeing and almost unthinking mass, riveted to a point in space and in the world henceforth only through the anonymous alertness of the senses."

Merleau-Ponty, Maurice (2002-03-14). Phenomenology of Perception (Routledge Classics) (pp. 189-190). Taylor and Francis..