Time: Mechanism and Measurement

Teaching a seminar on time this winter at UC Davis. Here's the flyer:

And here's the readings list: Adam, Barbara. 2002. “Perceptions of Time.” In Companion Encyclopedia of Anthropology, edited by Tim Ingold, 503–26. London and New York: Routledge. Borges, Jorge Luis. 1962. “Funes, The Memorious.” In Ficciones, 107–15. New York: Grove Press. Chiang, Ted. 1998. “Story of Your Life.” Starlight 2. Cushman, Robert E. 1953. “Greek and Christian Views of Time.” The Journal of Religion 33 (4): 254–65. Drake, Stillman. 1975. “The Role of Music in Galileo’s Experiments.” Scientific American 72: 98–105. Elias, N. 1992. Time: An Essay. http://www.umlaufoviny.com/Liberec/CAD/texty/Elias_Time.pdf. Evans-Pritchard, E.E. 1939. “Nuer Time-Reckoning.” Africa: Journal of the International African Institute 12 (2): 189–216. Flusser, Vilem. 2012. “Vampyroteuthian Existence.” In Vampyroteuthis Infernalis, 71–80. New York: Atropos Press. Galison, Peter. 2000. “Einstein’s Clocks: The Place of TIme.” Critical Inquiry 26 (2): 355–89. Geertz, Clifford. 1973. “Person, Time, and Conduct in Bali.” In The Interpretation of Cultures, 360–412. New York, N.Y.: Basic Books. http://hypergeertz.jku.at/GeertzTexts/Person_Time_Conduct.htm. Gleick, James. 2016. “A Nonlinear History of Time Travel.” Nautilus, September. http://nautil.us/issue/40/learning/a-nonlinear-history-of-time-travel. Glucksmann, Miriam A. 1998. “‘What a Difference a Day Makes’: A Theoretical and Historical Exploration of Temporality and Gender.” Sociology 32 (2): 239–58. Greenwood, Veronique. 2016. “How Sunflowers Follow the SUn.” The Atlantic, August. http://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2016/08/why-sunflowers-follow-the-sun/497711/. Ingold, Tim. 2000. “Work, Time and Industry.” In The Perception of the Environment, 323–38. London and New York: Routledge. Jackson, Steven J. 2016. “Speed, Time, Infrastructure: Temporalities of Breakdown, Maintenance, and Repair.” In Sociology of Speed. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. Lakoff, George, and Mark Johnson. 1980. Metaphors We Live By. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Le Goff, Jacques. 1980. “Merchant’s Time and Church’s Time in the Middle Ages.” In Time, Work, and Culture in the Middle Ages, edited by Arthur Goldhammer, 29–42. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Lefebvre, Henri, and Catherine Regulier. 1999. “The Rhythmanalytical Project.” Rethinking Marxism 11 (1): 5–13. Lock, Margaret. 2004. “Living Cadavers and the Calculation of Death.” Body & Society 10 (2–3): 135–52. Marx, Karl. 1867. “The Working Day.” In Capital, Volume 1. https://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1867-c1/ch10.htm. Miyazaki, Shintaro. 2012. “Algorhythmics: Understanding Micro-Temporality in Computational Cultures.” Computational Culture, no. 28 September. Munn, Nancy D. 1992. “The Cultural Anthropology of Time: A Critical Essay.” Annual Review of Anthropology 21: 93–123. Postill, John. 2002. “Clock and Calendar Time: A Missing Anthropological Problem.” Time & Society 11 (23): 251–70. Sanger, Eva. 2015. “Obstetrical Care as a Matter of Time: Ultrasound Screening, Temporality and Prevention.” HPLS 37 (1): 104–20. Schivelbusch, Wolfgang. 1986. “Railroad Space and Railroad Time.” In The Railway Journey: The Industrialization of Time and Space in the 19th Century, 33–44. University of California Press. http://www.daaq.net/folio/bibliography/b_schivelbusch.html. Spinney, Laura. 2005. “How Time Flies.” Guardian Unlimited, February 24. https://www.theguardian.com/science/2005/feb/24/4. Thompson, E. P. 1967. “Time, Work-Discipline, and Industrial Capitalism.” Past & Present, no. 38: 56–97. Traweek, Sharon. 1992. Beamtimes and Lifetimes: The World of High Energy Physicists. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press. Treas, Judith. 2009. “Age in Standards and Standards for Age: Institutionalizing Chronological Age as Biographical Necessity.” In Standards and Their Stories: How Quantifying Classifying and Formalizing Practices Shape Everyday Life, edited by Martha Lampland and Susan Leigh Star, 65–87. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. Tsing, Anna Lowenhaupt. 2015. “Arts of Noticing.” In The Mushroom at the End of the World: On the Possibility of Life in Capitalist Ruins, 17–25. Princeton: Princeton UP. Wajcman, Judy. 2008. “Life in the Fast Lane? Towards a Sociology of Technology and Time.” The British Journal of Sociology 59 (1): 59–77. doi:10.1111/j.1468-4446.2007.00182.x. Whorf, Benjamin Lee. 1956. “The Relation of Habitual Thought and Behavior to Language.” In Language, Thought, and Reality, edited by John B Carroll, 134–59. New York, N.Y: MIT Press and John Wiley & Sons. Zalasiewicz, Jan, Mark Williams, Alan Haywood, and Michael Ellis. 2011. “The Anthropocene: A New Epoch of Geological Time?” Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, no. 369: 835–41.    

And here's the readings list:

Adam, Barbara. 2002. “Perceptions of Time.” In Companion Encyclopedia of Anthropology, edited by Tim Ingold, 503–26. London and New York: Routledge.

Borges, Jorge Luis. 1962. “Funes, The Memorious.” In Ficciones, 107–15. New York: Grove Press.

Chiang, Ted. 1998. “Story of Your Life.” Starlight 2.

Cushman, Robert E. 1953. “Greek and Christian Views of Time.” The Journal of Religion 33 (4): 254–65.

Drake, Stillman. 1975. “The Role of Music in Galileo’s Experiments.” Scientific American 72: 98–105.

Elias, N. 1992. Time: An Essay. http://www.umlaufoviny.com/Liberec/CAD/texty/Elias_Time.pdf.

Evans-Pritchard, E.E. 1939. “Nuer Time-Reckoning.” Africa: Journal of the International African Institute 12 (2): 189–216.

Flusser, Vilem. 2012. “Vampyroteuthian Existence.” In Vampyroteuthis Infernalis, 71–80. New York: Atropos Press.

Galison, Peter. 2000. “Einstein’s Clocks: The Place of TIme.” Critical Inquiry 26 (2): 355–89.

Geertz, Clifford. 1973. “Person, Time, and Conduct in Bali.” In The Interpretation of Cultures, 360–412. New York, N.Y.: Basic Books. http://hypergeertz.jku.at/GeertzTexts/Person_Time_Conduct.htm.

Gleick, James. 2016. “A Nonlinear History of Time Travel.” Nautilus, September. http://nautil.us/issue/40/learning/a-nonlinear-history-of-time-travel.

Glucksmann, Miriam A. 1998. “‘What a Difference a Day Makes’: A Theoretical and Historical Exploration of Temporality and Gender.” Sociology 32 (2): 239–58.

Greenwood, Veronique. 2016. “How Sunflowers Follow the SUn.” The Atlantic, August. http://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2016/08/why-sunflowers-follow-the-sun/497711/.

Ingold, Tim. 2000. “Work, Time and Industry.” In The Perception of the Environment, 323–38. London and New York: Routledge.

Jackson, Steven J. 2016. “Speed, Time, Infrastructure: Temporalities of Breakdown, Maintenance, and Repair.” In Sociology of Speed. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Lakoff, George, and Mark Johnson. 1980. Metaphors We Live By. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Le Goff, Jacques. 1980. “Merchant’s Time and Church’s Time in the Middle Ages.” In Time, Work, and Culture in the Middle Ages, edited by Arthur Goldhammer, 29–42. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Lefebvre, Henri, and Catherine Regulier. 1999. “The Rhythmanalytical Project.” Rethinking Marxism 11 (1): 5–13.

Lock, Margaret. 2004. “Living Cadavers and the Calculation of Death.” Body & Society 10 (2–3): 135–52.

Marx, Karl. 1867. “The Working Day.” In Capital, Volume 1. https://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1867-c1/ch10.htm.

Miyazaki, Shintaro. 2012. “Algorhythmics: Understanding Micro-Temporality in Computational Cultures.” Computational Culture, no. 28 September.

Munn, Nancy D. 1992. “The Cultural Anthropology of Time: A Critical Essay.” Annual Review of Anthropology 21: 93–123.

Postill, John. 2002. “Clock and Calendar Time: A Missing Anthropological Problem.” Time & Society 11 (23): 251–70.

Sanger, Eva. 2015. “Obstetrical Care as a Matter of Time: Ultrasound Screening, Temporality and Prevention.” HPLS 37 (1): 104–20.

Schivelbusch, Wolfgang. 1986. “Railroad Space and Railroad Time.” In The Railway Journey: The Industrialization of Time and Space in the 19th Century, 33–44. University of California Press. http://www.daaq.net/folio/bibliography/b_schivelbusch.html.

Spinney, Laura. 2005. “How Time Flies.” Guardian Unlimited, February 24. https://www.theguardian.com/science/2005/feb/24/4.

Thompson, E. P. 1967. “Time, Work-Discipline, and Industrial Capitalism.” Past & Present, no. 38: 56–97.

Traweek, Sharon. 1992. Beamtimes and Lifetimes: The World of High Energy Physicists. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press.

Treas, Judith. 2009. “Age in Standards and Standards for Age: Institutionalizing Chronological Age as Biographical Necessity.” In Standards and Their Stories: How Quantifying Classifying and Formalizing Practices Shape Everyday Life, edited by Martha Lampland and Susan Leigh Star, 65–87. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.

Tsing, Anna Lowenhaupt. 2015. “Arts of Noticing.” In The Mushroom at the End of the World: On the Possibility of Life in Capitalist Ruins, 17–25. Princeton: Princeton UP.

Wajcman, Judy. 2008. “Life in the Fast Lane? Towards a Sociology of Technology and Time.” The British Journal of Sociology 59 (1): 59–77. doi:10.1111/j.1468-4446.2007.00182.x.

Whorf, Benjamin Lee. 1956. “The Relation of Habitual Thought and Behavior to Language.” In Language, Thought, and Reality, edited by John B Carroll, 134–59. New York, N.Y: MIT Press and John Wiley & Sons.

Zalasiewicz, Jan, Mark Williams, Alan Haywood, and Michael Ellis. 2011. “The Anthropocene: A New Epoch of Geological Time?” Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, no. 369: 835–41.

 

 

Three Electric Guitar Compositions

For Sean Matthew Montgomery

1. Connect a guitar to an amplifier with as long an instrument cable as is available. Turn the amplifier off and hide the guitar, still plugged in, somewhere out of the amplifier's line of sight. The amplifier should then be turned on and the settings adjusted until feedback is produced.

2. Bury an electric guitar in a (preferably wooden) box, facing upwards, with its cable running to the surface. Plug cable into an above-ground amplifier placed on or near the place where the guitar is buried in such a way that feedback is produced. Alternatively, the amplifier cabinet may be secretly buried by a third party, who may then invite the performer to locate it by using the guitar as a dowsing rod.

3. Anoint an electric guitar and amplifier with moose scent and place in the woods with an appropriate remote power source. Substitute animals and lures as needed.